The Thing From The Future [...]

The object of the game is to come up with the most entertaining and thought-provoking descriptions of hypothetical objects from different near-, medium-, and long-term futures. Each round, players collectively generate a creative prompt by playing a card game. This prompt outlines the kind of future that the thing-to-be-imagined comes from, specifies what part of society or culture it belongs to, describes the type of object that it is, and suggests an emotional reaction that it might spark in an observer from the present. Players must then each write a short description of an object that fits the constraints of the prompt. These descriptions are then read aloud (without attribution), and players vote on which description they find the most interesting, provocative, or funny. The winner of each round keeps the cards put into play for that round, and whoever has the most cards when the game ends is declared the overall winner. (Source)

AI Essays and AI Feedback [...]

as educators, if we are setting students assignments that can be answered by AI Transformers, are we really helping students learn? There are many better ways to assess for learning: constructive feedback, peer assessment, teachback. If Transformer AI systems have a lasting influence on education, maybe that will come from educators and policy makers having to rethink how to assess students, away from setting assignments that machines can answer, towards assessment for learning. (Source)

Text Inflator [...]

It is 5 AM and you have a paper due in 3 hours. After staying up all night, you have only managed to type up 5 pages of the 8 page requirement, and you are beginning to run out of ideas. Never fear, Text Inflator is here to save your sanity.

Paste text in the form below to expand your paper without adding ideas, meaning, or value. (Source)

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Training students to hide [...]

Some researchers have found that because people express themselves through tens or hundreds of subtle and complex facial expressions, bodily gestures or physiological signals, categorizing their state with a single label is an ill-suited approach. Other research indicates that people communicate emotions such as anger, fear and surprise in ways that vary across cultures and situations, and how they express emotion can fluctuate on an individual level. (Source)

Virtual Proctoring [...]

This interactive is intended to show how technology can mistake seemingly normal student behavior as reprehensible. (Source)